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British Ammunition

There are several types of ammunition available in Cliffs of Dover, we’ll go over the different types used by the RAF and explain their composition and effects. It’s important to note that although Cliffs of Dover allows unlimited use of ammo types, some were in fact quite rare and not in abundant supply.

Ammo Type Description
Ball, .303 inch, Magazine Rifle, Cordite, Mark I Jacketed round nose bullet with lead core.
Ball, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark VI Jacketed round nose hollow point bullet with lead core.
Ball, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark VII Jacketed pointed bullet with internal paper or aluminum tip and lead base.
Tracer (Yellow), G, 500 yd, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark I Jacketed tracer, yellow. 500 yard burn on tracer.
Tracer (Yellow), G, Infantry Long Range, 1000 yd, .303 inch, Cordite Mark II Jacketed tracer, yellow. 1000 yard burn on tracer.
Tracer (Red), G, Naval 800 yd, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark III Jacketed tracer, red. 800 yard burn on tracer.
Tracer (Yellow), G, Aircraft 550 yd, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark IV Jacketed tracer, yellow. 550 yard burn on tracer.
Tracer (Burgundy), G, Aircraft Night Dimmed, 550 yd, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark V Jacketed tracer, burgundy. 550 yard “dim” burn on tracer.
Tracer (Yellow), G, Aircraft, 550 yd, .303 inch, Nitrocellulose, Mark VIz Jacketed tracer, yellow. 550 yard burn on tracer.
Armour Piercing, W, .303 inch, Nitrocellulose, Mark Iz Armour piercing jacketed bullet.
Incendiary/Tracer (White), B, .303 inch, Nitrocellulose, Mark Iz Incendiary bullet with tracer composition.
Incendiary, B, .303 inch, Nitrocellulose, Mark VIz, “De Wilde” Improved incendiary bullet.
Observer, O, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark I Observer round, designed to show a puff of smoke when striking a target.

* Cordite and Nitrocellulose are two different types of propellant. Cordite is a long stick-like propellant, and Nitrocellulose is a tiny flake propellant.

Detailed Explanations

Ball, .303 inch, Magazine Rifle, Cordite, Mark I

Jacketed round nose bullet with lead core.

Ball, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark VI

Jacketed round nose hollow point bullet with lead core.

Ball, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark VII

Jacketed pointed bullet with soft nose and lead base.

Tracer (Yellow), G, 500 yd, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark I

Jacketed tracer, yellow. 500 yard burn on tracer.

Tracer (Yellow), G, Infantry Long Range, 1000 yd, .303 inch, Cordite Mark II

Jacketed tracer, yellow. 1000 yard burn on tracer.

Tracer (Red), G, Naval 800 yd, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark III

Jacketed tracer, red. 800 yard burn on tracer.

Tracer (Yellow), G, Aircraft 550 yd, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark IV

Jacketed tracer, yellow. 550 yard burn on tracer.

Tracer (Burgundy), G, Aircraft Night Dimmed, 550 yd, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark V

Jacketed tracer, burgundy. 550 yard “dim” burn on tracer. Grey tipped projectile.

Tracer (Yellow), G, Aircraft, 550 yd, .303 inch, Nitrocellulose, Mark VIz

Jacketed tracer, yellow. 550 yard burn on tracer. White tipped projectile.

Armour Piercing, W, .303 inch, Nitrocellulose, Mark Iz

Armour piercing jacketed bullet. Green tipped projectile.

Incendiary/Tracer (White), B, .303 inch, Nitrocellulose, Mark Iz

Incendiary bullet with tracer composition.

Incendiary, B, .303 inch, Nitrocellulose, Mark VIz, “De Wilde

Improved incendiary bullet.

Observer, O, .303 inch, Cordite, Mark I

Observer round, designed to show a puff of smoke when striking a target.

Ammo Types and their uses

You can basically separate all the above listed ammunition types into six categories.

Standard Ball round - This would be the most commonly used and available round for the Royal Air Force and Corpo Aereo Italiano during the Battle of Britain. Bullets with a lead core don’t have excessive penetrating power and will tend to mushroom when they hit something solid.

Armor Piercing - Standard round for the Luftwaffe, less common for RAF and CAI. Armor piercing rounds will do exactly what you think they’d do; pierce armor. AP rounds will have significantly higher penetrating power than a lead core round will, but is almost useless against non-critical parts of an airplane since it will just put a clean hole through something soft and pass right through; unless of course the pilot is in the path of the bullet.

Incendiary Rounds - These rounds are designed to start fires, specifically in fuel systems. If the fuel system is protected by armor these rounds on their own are unable to penetrate the armor protection; used in conjunction with armor piercing rounds they can set the fuel on fire after the armor piercing round punctures the tank.

Tracer Rounds - These rounds are intended to help the pilot with aim, they have about the same penetrating power as a ball round unless they have an armor piercing property to them.

Observer Rounds - These rounds are similar to Tracer rounds in that they are designed to assist the pilot with aim. British Observer rounds show a puff of smoke when they hit a target, but they do very little damage. German Beobachtung rounds explode when they hit a target and are slightly more effective than the British version.

Multi-Purpose Rounds - These are bullets that are designed to do more than one thing. Multi-purpose rounds can be quite effective, but you have to remember that they sacrifice some of their abilities by trying to do more than one thing. For example, a straight “armor piercing” round will have more penetrating power than a round that is an “armor-piercing tracer” or an “armor-piercing incendiary”. The material that is removed from an armor piercing round to add the tracer or incendiary compound will affect the density and weight of the projectile.

raf_ammunition.txt · Last modified: 2013/04/03 20:49 by ATAG_Keller